The Ultimate Guide to Running Shoes

The Ultimate Guide to Running Shoes

The right running shoe can prevent injuries by providing comfort, shock absorption, support, and control. Running shoes can be a tool if chosen carefully by correcting your stride back to its natural position. You are your strongest and performing at your best when your stride is in line. The first step is to determined the type of running shoe based on your needs and foot type. Rogan's complete Best Fit Running Guide is located on our website, but here are the basics to get you started.

1. Neutral Running Shoe
These are also known as cushioning shoes because the cushioning is concentrated in the midsole, which provides extra shock absorption. Neutral shoes are good for under pronators, as well as midfoot and forefoot strikers. If you have high arches or do not pronate effectively this is the type of shoe we would recommend. All of these characteristics need little to no correction from running shoes. A neutral shoe has no additional support, so it will allow the most movement of the foot to enable a more natural ride.

Examples:
Neutral Running Shoes

The styles above are available in a variety colors, in men's and women's sizes. Popular brands like Nike, Adidas, and Reebok are generally neutral shoes.

2. Guidance Running Shoe
Guidance shoes do have built in support, unlike neutral running shoes. They also minimize the force of impact. Runners who are mid pronators benefit most from a guidance shoe. A guidance shoe provides a slight correction in your stride, while still allowing the foot to move naturally.

Examples:
Guidance Running Shoes
                  Saucony Guide Iso  -  Brooks Pure Cadence 7  -  Mizuno Wave Inspire 14  -  ASICS Kayano 24

All styles featured above are available in men's and women's sizes, as well as different colors.

3. Stability Running Shoe
Stability shoes are the most common because they are best suited for those with normal or medium arches. Moderate pronators also benefit from this type of running shoe because the structural support restricts the natural movement of the foot to correct your stride. There is ample midsole cushioning, as well as more medial support than the guidance shoe.

Examples:
Stability Running Shoes
                   Mizuno Paradox 4  -  Saucony Omni 16  -  Brooks Adrenaline GTS 18  -  New Balance M940BR3

The styles shown are offered in men's and women's sizes, in addition to a variety of colors.

4. Motion Control Running Shoe
Motion control shoes have maximum support optimal for runners with low or flat arches. They have wider and flatter outsoles. Additionally, there is a generous amount of support in the shoe's medial sides to decrease the degree of pronation, which is best for moderate to severe pronators. Motion control shoes are built to keep your foot and body aligned during stride.

Examples:
Motion Control Running Shoes
                ASICS Gel Foundation 12  -  Saucony Redeemer Iso  -  Brooks Ariel  -  Brooks Beast' 16

The Brooks Ariel is only offered in women's sizes and the Brooks Beast' 16 is only offered in men's. However, the ASICS Gel Foundation 12 and Saucony Redeemer Iso are available in both men's and women's sizes, and also in multiple colors.

Once you determine the type of running shoe you need, the next step would be to decide on the best size. Generally, running shoes tend to fit small so it is important to try them on. When fitting a shoe, the ball of your foot, which is the widest, should line up perfectly with the widest part of the shoe. Likewise, toes should not feel crammed in the toe box.When choosing a width, feet should rest gently against the sides of the shoe when standing and not feel jammed. When you have the shoes on get up and walk around ensuring there is no pitching, squeezing, pressure, heel slippage, and so on.

If you need to be measured for your shoe size or need help determining what type of running shoe is best for you, stop in at one of our 33 Rogan's Shoes' locations! Our employees are happy to help. Or you can call the customer service center at 1-800-976-4267 with questions.



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